The One Thing Many Health Professionals Recommend for Pregnancy

Serola Belt for Pregnant Women

If there’s one thing chiropractors, osteopaths, and physiotherapists all have in common practice, it’s their recommendation of a Serola Sacroiliac Belt (or similar) to people suffering with sacroiliac joint problems, commonly called Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction.

The Serola Sacroiliac Belt was invented in 1989 by Hawaiian chiropractor, Dr. Rick Serola, as a tool to help stabilise an unstable pelvis.

These belts can be particularly effective in supporting the changing ligaments and muscles of the pelvis during pregnancy.

Let’s explore how they can help…

What makes the Pelvis unstable?

The pelvis is made up of three bones: the sacrum and two ilium bones.

The sacroiliac joint (or SI joint) is the joint between the sacrum and the ilium bones of the pelvis, which are connected by strong ligaments (Fig. 1).

These SI joints are critical in transferring the load bearing of the upper body to the lower body, and can attract considerable stress during pregnancy due to hormonal changes and the necessary changes in weight bearing.

The ligaments of the SI joints can become over-stretched as the baby grows, leading to excess motion or instability of the joints. When these ligaments are sprained, nerves within them can be irritated, stimulating specific muscles to keep pressure off the injured ligament. This reaction is known as the ligamento-muscular reflex (1-4).

Pelvic joint function may become compromised when the function of muscles changes to guard an injured ligament. This change in pelvic function may leave a person feeling like their muscles are excessively tight or twisted out of alignment.

What makes the Pelvis unstable?

The pelvis is made up of three bones: the sacrum and two ilium bones.

The sacroiliac joint (or SI joint) is the joint between the sacrum and the ilium bones of the pelvis, which are connected by strong ligaments (Fig. 1).

These SI joints are critical in transferring the load bearing of the upper body to the lower body, and can attract considerable stress during pregnancy due to hormonal changes and the necessary changes in weight bearing.

The ligaments of the SI joints can become over-stretched as the baby grows, leading to excess motion or instability of the joints. When these ligaments are sprained, nerves within them can be irritated, stimulating specific muscles to keep pressure off the injured ligament. This reaction is known as the ligamento-muscular reflex (1-4).

Pelvic joint function may become compromised when the function of muscles changes to guard an injured ligament. This change in pelvic function may leave a person feeling like their muscles are excessively tight or twisted out of alignment.

Common symptoms of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction during Pregnancy

Some of the common problems relating to SI Joint Dysfunction during pregnancy include (5):

  • Low back pain/stiffness
  • Hip pain/stiffness
  • Groin pain
  • Knee, leg, ankle pain/stiffness
  • “Catch” in the hip
  • Knee wants to “give out”
  • Ankle “turns easy”
  • Mimic disc herniation with leg pain

How the Serola Sacroiliac Belt helps during Pregnancy


The Serola Sacroiliac Belt is designed to compress and support the sacroiliac joints, thereby relieving stress and instability at these weight bearing structures.

This can be useful during pregnancy, with the aim of allowing the ligaments to heal around the pelvic joints.

Want to know more?

Our Serola Sacroliac Belts come in different sizes and retail for $65 each. They can be worn discretely beneath clothing and are easy to put on and take off.

For more information on the Serola belts, or to organise a time for a complimentary fitting with one of our chiropractors, please call Blue Align Chiropractic at 07-3356 9552.

Serola Belt for Pregnant Women

References:

  1. Solomonow, M., et al., Mechanoreceptors and reflex arc in the feline shoulder. Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons … [et al.]. 1996. 5(2 Pt 1): p. 139-46.
  2. Solomonow, M. and M. Krogsgaard, Sensorimotor control of knee stability. A review. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 2001. 11(2): p. 64-80.
  3. Solomonow, M., Ligaments: a source of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 2004. 14(1): p. 49-60.
  4. Johansson, H., Role of Knee Joint Ligaments in Proprioception and Regulation of Muscle Stiffness. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 1991. 1(3): p. 158-179.
  5. Schamberger, The Malalignment Syndrome: Implications for Medicine & Sport, 2002, Elsevier Bernard & Kirkaldy-Willis, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 1987: 217(266-280)

DISCLAIMER: All content is created and published online for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice and should not be relied on as health or personal advice. Always seek the guidance of your doctor or other qualified health professional with any questions you may have regarding your health or a medical condition.

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